Breakfast Foods Of The World

Every morning, people around the world sit down and eat the most important meal of the day: breakfast. However, breakfast meals differ greatly around the world. Americans love eating eggs for breakfast, but that would be unfathomable in some parts of Europe. Isn’t it interesting how different our tastes are? Let’s have a look at breakfast foods of the world.

North America

In the USA and Canada, the typical breakfast is comprised of eggs cooked to your preference, meat (usually bacon or sausage), toast, potatoes, and a bit of fruit on the side. Other popular choices include pancakes, oatmeal, and yogurt. It’s a filling meal meant to include lots of protein.

South America

Different South American countries have different preferred breakfast foods, but they’re all flavorful and nutritious. Some of the most popular dishes are arepas (corn cakes filled with savory fillings like cheese and pork), calentado (arepas with beans, rice, eggs, and meat), and medialunas (crescent rolls).

Europe

Europe also has varying breakfast preferences across the continent, from sweet to sour to savory. The French like fresh pastries and coffee, the Dutch eat bread with hagelslag (sweet sprinkles), and the Swedes love open-faced savory sandwiches. Breakfast dishes differ just as much as the wide variety of cultures and languages in Europe, but they all have their own unique charm.

Africa

Each African country has its favorite breakfast dish, but many of them have foods in common, like breads and porridges. People in Africa start their day with meals like chai and mandazi (sweet doughnut-like buns), akara (deep-fried spiced beans), and sweet pudding. These all seem so delicious, we can’t decide which one we like best!

Middle East

At Middle Eastern breakfast table, not only do you wake up, so do your tastebuds! Savory, delectable dishes like shakshouka (poached eggs in tomato chili sauce), ful medames (dried fava beans), and bread with zaatar (a powerful spice mixture) ensure that you’re nurtured and ready to tackle the day ahead of you.

Asia

It’s impossible to pinpoint one Asian breakfast food as there are so many beloved morning foods to choose from. China, Thailand, and Indonesia prefer congee (rice porridge). India likes hot breads, such as paratha and dosa. Japan loves rice, miso soup, and natto (fermented soybeans). The list goes on and on!

Oceania

Breakfast in Australia is similar to North American breakfasts, but it’s totally different in Polynesia. Popular breakfast meals include firi firi (coconut milk donuts), raw fish, and fresh fruit. In other words, they prefer foods that are both influenced by their ties to France, but also by which ingredients are readily available on the islands. Yum!

What do you eat for breakfast? Let us know!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

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Beyond KBBQ: Common Korean Foods

Korean Food

Korean BBQ has taken the US by storm, and for good reason: it’s amazing! However, there’s a whole world of Korean food outside of BBQ. Let’s learn about some common Korean dishes!

Bibimbap

Bibimbap is a simple but delicious meal: white rice topped with sautéed vegetables, fried egg, and gochujang. It’s colorful, healthy, and contains a wide variety of different flavors to dazzle your tastebuds!

Tteokbokki

Tteokbokki are Korean spicy rice cakes. The soft, chewy texture pairs well with the heat of the chilis in the sauce. Make sure you have some water on hand when you eat this one!

Jjajangmyeon

Jjajangmyeon is another classic Korean favorite. It’s noodles topped with black bean sauce, pork, and zucchini. This one is sure to satisfy even the biggest of appetites!

Budae jjigae

Budae jjigae, or “army stew,” is a Korean hot pot dish with spicy chili broth, ramen noodles, Spam, sausage, tofu, kimchi, mushrooms, onions, and cheese. It’s a hearty stew meant to fill you up and keep you warm.

Mandu

Mandu are similar to gyoza and potstickers: tender dough wrapped around a meat or vegetable filling, dipped in a dipping sauce. This dish makes a great appetizer.

Have you tried any of these Korean foods before? Which one would you like to try first?

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

Ramen vs Pho

If you live in the USA, you know how popular ramen and pho are. People have gone absolutely nuts over these noodle soups, and for good reason! Both are amazing, but they’re definitely not the same dish! Let’s take a look at the ways these dishes differ, and what really makes them irresistible.

Origins

Pho is 100% Vietnamese, but the origin of ramen is a bit more uncertain. Many believe that it actually came from China, but spread to Japan and then evolved into a totally different dish as the Japanese adapted it to local tastes. Wherever it’s from, we’re just glad it exists now!

Broth

There’s no one standard type of ramen broth as each region of Japan has its own special version of ramen. However, most ramen broths in the USA are thick and made with miso paste or pork stock.

Pho broth is more uniform; it’s most often clear and made with more spices, such as star anise and coriander seeds.

Noodles

Pho uses Banh Pho, a type of flat rice noodle. These are much more delicate than ramen noodles, which are thicker and made with wheat, making them nice and chewy. Both types of noodles are perfect pairings for the textures of their respective broths.

Toppings

Ramen is often served with chashu pork, soft boiled eggs, spring onions, and bean sprouts. Pho’s typical toppings are completely different; they generally include basil, onions, peppers, lime, and cilantro. These create very distinct flavors for both dishes, but both are equally tasty!

Which one do you prefer, ramen or pho? Are they any great ramen or pho restaurants where you live? Let us know in the comments!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

Types of Ramen Broth

WN Ramen

WN Foods just released a Miso Ramen Base that you mix with water to create a delicious broth, and we’re working to create more flavors in the future. Let’s take a look at miso ramen broth and a few of our other options!

Miso

As it says in the name, miso ramen broth is made with miso, a fermented Japanese soy paste. The rich umami (savory) flavor of this broth pairs well with any topping you can think of! It’s a great option for warming yourself up on cold days.

Tonkotsu

Tonkotsu broth is made with pork bones. It’s often creamy, full of complex flavors, and very filling. Toppings like fish cakes and eggs really soak up the prominent taste of the broth. Doesn’t it make you hungry?

Shoyu

Soy sauce is the most important player in shoyu ramen broth. It sounds simple, but together with the chicken stock, ginger, and kombu, it creates a symphony of various different delicious flavors. We can’t wait to make this one for our wonderful customers!

Shio

Shio ramen gets its taste simply from salt. It’s a clear, light broth that is great for ramen newbies and veterans alike. Its straightforward but tasteful flavor makes it easy to pair with all your favorite toppings!

Have you tried any of these ramen broths before? Which type of would you like to try first?

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

Dipping Sauces of the World

Dipping Sauces of the World

Here at WN Foods, we believe that life is more beautiful with dipping sauces. Plain old chips or bland fries can be completely transformed with the right one. That must be why so many cultures around the world have their own. Let’s take a look at a few of the world’s dipping sauces!

Ponzu Sauce

This Japanese sauce is simple, but extremely flavorful and versatile. Soy sauce and lemon juice aren’t a combination we’re used to in the US, but believe us when we say that it’s amazing, and pairs well with everything from gyoza to shabu shabu.

Curry Ketchup

Curry ketchup is a spiced ketchup popular all around Europe, but especially Germany. It’s typically served with fries or meat, and is a hit because of its complex but approachable flavor. If you’re bored of plain old ketchup, definitely give this one a try!

Lingonberry Sauce

You may know this sauce from a certain Swedish furniture chain. Lingonberry sauce is a tart dipping sauce from Sweden, often paired with meatballs. We know it sounds like an unusual flavor combination, but it’s really delicious!

Tahini

This dipping sauce is popular worldwide, from the Mediterranean to the Middle East. It’s made of ground sesame seeds and is served with anything from falafel to raw vegetable slices. What would you eat tahini sauce with?

Sweet & Sour Sauce

Sweet & sour sauce is an iconic Chinese condiment, usually used with chicken or as a dipping sauce for egg rolls. We can’t get enough of the rich, tangy flavor. That’s why we started selling our sweet & sour sauce in bottles in our online store!

Have you tried any of these dipping sauce before? Which one would you like to try first?

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.