3 Easy Asian Fusion Recipes

Thanks to airplanes and the Internet, globalization is on the rise. Food cultures clash and combine, and sometimes form entirely new genres as a result. Asian fusion food is one of the most prominent examples of this; it takes traditionally Asian ingredients and incorporates them into other famous dishes like burritos, tacos, and pizza. Sounds great, right? Let’s look at a few recipes for homemade Asian fusion food!

Sushi Burrito

If you live in a major US city, you may have seen sushi burritos on the news. Restaurants serving these jumbo maki rolls had lines of around entire city blocks because people just couldn’t get enough. Don’t worry though, you no longer have to wait in line. Sushi burritos are actually quick and easy to make at home! We recommend this recipe from Spoon University with our Double Hi Soy Sauce.

Ginger Chicken Tacos


(Photo from Well Plated)

Ginger chicken is common in Chinese and Thai dishes, and is great when eaten in a taco shell with fresh vegetables. It’s nutritious and packed with complex flavors, but it’s quite simple to prepare! Just follow this recipe from Well Plated and you’ll be ready for taco night in no time.

Thai Chicken Pizza

(Photo from What’s Gaby Cooking)

We know that peanut sauce on pizza sounds strange, but trust us and the many other fans of this pizza when we say that it’s a match made in heaven. The crunchy vegetables, creamy peanut sauce, and tender chicken all sitting on a golden brown pizza crust… what more could you ask for? Check out this recipe from What’s Gaby Cooking to try Thai chicken pizza for yourself!

So, are you hungry yet? Which of these Asian fusion recipes will you try first? Let us know in the comments!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

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Dumplings: The Universal Language Of Food

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At their base, dumplings are just dough wrapped around a filling, yet every region of the world has its own unique version of them. Why are they loved by so many around the globe? Is it because they’re easy to make? Is it because they keep you warm in winter? Or is it simply because they’re downright delicious? Whatever the reason, dumplings are the universal language of the food world, and we want to be fluent. Let’s educate ourselves on a few different variations!

Europe

Dumplings Europe

Among European dumplings, the potato is king. Whether it’s pierogi from Poland, gnocchi from Italy, or kroppkakor from Sweden, almost all of them feature dough with a mashed potato filling along with meat or cheese. Not that we’re complaining; after all, if you want something hot and hearty, it’s hard to go wrong with potatoes.

Africa

Dumplings Africa

Dumplings from Africa don’t always include a filling, but they’re still sure to fill you up. Madombi from Botswana and banku and kenkey from Ghana are all doughy dumplings made from flour or cornmeal, often served with fragrant soup, sauce, or meat. We don’t know about you, but we’re absolutely fascinated by all the different flavor combinations you could create with these dumplings.

South America

Dumplings SA

South America is all about meaty dumplings. Coxinhas, empanadas, and papas rellenas are all dough pockets filled to the brim with juicy chicken, pork, and beef. These dumplings are massively popular from Brazil to Argentina to Colombia, and it’s not hard to see why. Just looking at those photos is enough to work up an appetite!

Oceania

Dumplings Oceania

Oceania’s dumplings are pretty different, but trust us when we say that they’re all delicious. Hawaii loves manapua (steamed buns), Tonga loves faikakai (coconut caramel dumplings), and New Zealand loves boil up (doughy dumplings with vegetables in pork stock). They all have exquisite taste, don’t you think?

Asia

Dumplings Asia

Asia is so crazy about dumplings that almost every Asian country has its own type of dumpling. We can’t fit all of them in here, so we chose a few of our favorites: xiao long bao (soup dumplings) from China, samosas (fried potato dumplings) from India, and gyoza (potstickers) from Japan. That last one tastes pretty great dipped in our Double Hi Potsticker Sauce, just so you know!

We’ve expanded our dumpling vocabulary, and now it’s time to try them in real life. Which one will you eat first? Let us know in the comments!

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Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

The History of WN Foods: Chapter 4

WN History 60s.JPG(John Young with drums of soy sauce)

The 1960s saw a more wide spread acceptance of soy sauce. Until then, it was considered a strictly Chinese ingredient, only to be used with Chinese foods. As more companies began to manufacture it in the USA, soy sauce became more widely available. With this increased accessibility, its reputation changed, making it a kitchen staple for all different kinds of foods. This opened many doors for WN Foods, allowing the company to sell its products to new customers, including mainstream grocery stores.

It was during that this time that WN Foods’ founder George Hall sadly passed away. With George’s memory and legacy in mind, John Young continued to run the company. He was soon joined by George’s son, Dave Hall. It was the beginning of a new era for WN Foods.

Up next… Chapter 5: The 1970s!

To see previous chapters, please click here.

wn-logo-transparentHere at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

The History of WN Foods: Chapter 3

WN History 50s
(John Young, Johnny Kan, George Chow, and George Hall)

Business was booming in the 1950s. Under George Hall and John Young’s leadership, WN Foods grew ever larger, diversifying its services and reaching out to states far and wide. Soy sauce and Chinese sausage manufacturing, importing and exporting goods, real estate, restaurant investments, new advertising techniques… George and John wanted to do it all. Because of their tireless dedication to expanding the company and the Chinese-American community, WN Foods became a prominent figure in San Francisco’s Chinatown. They were making history.

Up next… Chapter 4: The 1960s!

To see previous chapters, please click here.

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Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

WN Foods’ Online Store is now OPEN!

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Shop for your favorite Double Hi Brand sauces and have them shipped directly to you! To place an order, click HERE!

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Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.