French Food Vocabulary

Previously on the WN Foods blog, we have learned Mandarin and Korean food vocabulary. Today, it’s time for French!

  • Food = Nourriture
  • “J’adore la nourriture!” (I love food!)
  • Meat = Viande
  • “Elle ne mange pas de viande.” (She does not eat meat.)
  • Vegetables = Légumes
  • “Je vais acheter des légumes.” (I am going to buy some vegetables).
  • Bread  = Pain
  • “Il y a du pain à la boulangerie.” (There is bread at the bakery.)
  • Cheese = Fromage
  • “Ce fromage pue.” (This cheese stinks.)
  • Wine = Vin
  • “Je bois du vin tous les jours.” (I drink wine every day.)
  • Cake = Gâteau
  • “L’enfant a un gâteau.” (The child has a cake.)
  • Egg = Œuf
  • “Un œuf, s’il vous plaît.” (One egg, please.)
  • To eat = Manger
  • “Tu dois manger à notre restaurant!” (You should eat at our restaurant!)
  • To drink = Boire
  • “Il ne faut pas boire trop de café.” (One must not drink too much coffee.)

What’s your favorite food word in French? Which languages would you like to see featured on our blog? Let us know!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

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French Sauces

French food is known worldwide for its decadence and abundance of flavor. Did you know that much of this comes from the five French mother sauces? These sauces form the foundation of most other sauces found in French cuisine. Let’s have a look at these foundational sauces!

Béchamel

This creamy sauce feels luxurious on the tongue, but it is actually quite simple to make. With just milk and white roux (butter and flour), béchamel becomes a thick, velvety condiment that can be eaten as is or combined with other ingredients such as cheese, herbs, or onions. This sauce pairs well with hearty foods like beef, pasta, and potatoes.

Hollandaise

Hollandaise is a favorite of brunch fans all over the world, and it is also made with a few simple ingredients. This smooth, tangy sauce is an emulsion of butter, lemon juice, and egg yolks. Beyond eggs Benedict, Hollandaise is often used with seafood and vegetables to give them a kick of freshness and rich texture.

Velouté

Like béchamel, velouté starts with a roux, but it is then combined with stock (usually fish, chicken, or veal). The result is a deliciously savory white sauce that can be used with almost any French dish. It is a versatile condiment that is great to have in your cooking arsenal!

Tomat

French sauce tomat is not your average tomato sauce. Cooking it is a long process involving simmered meats, vegetables, and assorted herbs, but it pays off in the end when the sauce becomes a chunky, filling sauce. It is closer to a bolognese meat sauce than the runny tomato sauce we are used to in the USA.

Demi Glace

Demi glace or sauce Espagnole starts with a brown roux (similar to a white roux, but cooked longer until it becomes nuttier in flavor). Meat stock, bones, herbs, and vegetables are added to the roux and cooked until the sauce is thick, rich, and decadent. Spoon this over some dark meat with mushrooms and mashed potatoes, and you will feel like royalty.

What’s your favorite French mother sauce? Let us know!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.