Chinese Cooking Methods

Here at WN Foods, Chinese food is one of our all time favorite cuisines. While we love takeout like so many others in the USA, we also love homemade Chinese food. However, we’ve noticed that many people are hesitant to cook it at home. We promise that it isn’t as complicated as it seems! Today, let’s take a look at common Chinese cooking techniques and how to use them in your home kitchen.

Stir Frying

Stir frying is one of the most common techniques in Chinese cooking. It may have even originated in ancient China! This cooking method is known for being fast; it involves heating a pan and stirring ingredients in hot oil until cooked. Almost any ingredient you can imagine can be stir fried, but most recipes include some type of meat or seafood, chopped vegetables, and either rice or noodles. Many Chinese cooks stir fry food in a wok over a fire, but you can use this technique at home with a stove and a pan.

Red Cooking

Chinese red cooking takes longer than stir frying, but trust us when we say that the wait is worth it! Red cooking is a particular type of braising where ingredients are first sauteed at a high temperature, then slowly cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, star anise, and rice wine until the food is coated in a sweet, luxurious glaze. Duck and pork belly are most commonly prepared using this technique, but we recommend also trying it at home with tofu or your fish of choice. This Chinese cooking method doesn’t require any special equipment, so it can be done easily at home.

Steaming

Steaming is a versatile cooking technique used in Chinese dishes of all kinds. The most traditional form of steaming uses bamboo steamer baskets, which allow cooks to utilize steam from hot water to cook ingredients and also to quickly and easily serve the finished meal. Steaming creates tender, juicy dishes like soup dumplings, aromatic whole fish, and sweet buns. If you live near an Asian grocery store or can order from online shops, you can purchase bamboo baskets and use them on your stove. If you don’t have access to bamboo baskets, you can still steam food in a metal pot or even a microwave.

Roasting

Roast meats are a staple of Chinese cooking. This method uses dry heat, as in a fire or oven heat with no water, oil, or other cooking liquid. Roasted foods often end up having an irresistible golden brown finish without losing any of the tasty juices on the inside. Roast duck is the most famous roasted Chinese dish (which is why you might see them hanging from restaurant windows in Chinatown), but you can also roast flavorful pork belly or chicken. You can easily roast meals at home as long as you have an oven and some spice!

Boiling

Chinese food doesn’t have to be complicated to be good. Boiling is a perfect demonstration of how you can have an amazing feast without having many technical skills. The most difficult part of Chinese hot pot is creating the broth, which really only requires stewing a few aromatics for enough time. Once the broth is ready, any number of meats and vegetables can be chopped and cooked quickly by boiling them. Though you can do this with a stovetop pot, many families make this a shared experience by using a portable stove and placing the hot pot directly on the table.

What are your favorite cooking techniques? Which dishes would you like to cook with these methods? Let us know!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

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Our Staff’s Favorite WN Foods Sauces

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Even though we’re surrounded by sauces all day, we still absolutely love what we make! Even at home, we use our own products in our personal cooking all the time. Here are our staff’s favorite WN Foods sauces.

Margaret, Marketing Manager

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“I think my favorite would be the gochujang, which is the Korean fermented pepper base sauce. Several reasons why I enjoy this particular product—it’s a ubiquitous sauce, meaning that you can use it for anything and everything. You can use it for your stir fry, in your fried rice; you can use it for your soup, you can use it as a dipping sauce. It’s extremely versatile, and I also like the special, authentic Korean fermented pepper, the authentic goodness that’s being put into this particular formula.”

Bernadette, R&D Manager

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“Any type of sauce that we work from scratch… for example, General Tsao. We actually had the chance to develop like 5 or 6 different kinds of formulas, and all the clients were happily asking me for more different kinds. So that’s a blessing, and it’s a joyful moment for me!”

Hanh, Project Manager

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“My favorite sauces here are hoisin sauce, curry, and sriracha.”

Linda, Office Manager

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“Our stir fry sauce.”

Peter, Plant Manager

WN Interview Peter.png”My favorite sauce is probably the Thai chili peanut. It’s so versatile. I love it for salad!”

As you can see, the WN Foods staff has a pretty wide range of tastes in sauces. How about you? What’s your favorite sauce of ours? Let us know!

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Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your sauce recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or wingnienfoods@gmail.com.

Teriyaki Chicken Stir Fry

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(Photo by Cafe Delites)

Feeling hungry after reading our teriyaki sauce article? Did you know that our teriyaki sauce goes great with stir fry? We recommend trying it with this colorful recipe by Cafe Delites!

Here at WN Foods, we co-pack high quality teriyaki sauces, cooked with the finest ingredients. If you would like us to manufacture your teriyaki recipe, or if you would like our food science team to help you develop your own teriyaki sauce, please contact us at (510) 487-8877 or kkhov@wnfoods.com.

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(Photo by Cafe Delites)